BA (La Trobe), DipEd (La Trobe), PhD (Griffith), FAHA. 

Ian Hunter was an Australian Professorial Fellow whose research has two main foci. Since the mid 1990s he has been working on the history of early modern political, religious and philosophical thought, focusing on the academic culture of the Holy Roman German Empire. During this time his publications have included Rival Enlightenments: Civil and Metaphysical Philosophy in Early Modern Germany (2001); Natural Law and Civil Sovereignty: Moral Right and State Authority in Early Modern Political Thought (2002) (co-edited with David Saunders); Heresy in Transition: Transforming Ideas of Heresy in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (2005) (co-edited with John Christian Laursen and Cary J. Nederman); and The Philosopher in Early Modern Europe: The Nature of a Contested Identity (2006) (co-edited with Conal Condren and Stephen Gaukroger). In collaboration with Thomas Ahnert and Frank Grunert, he has recently completed the first English translation of works by the early enlightenment political jurist Christian Thomasius. His most recent book is The Secularisation of the Confessional State: The Political Thought of Christian Thomasius (2007). Since 2004 Professor Hunter has been developing a second research area, on the ‘history of theory’, whose aim is to provide an intellectual history of the 1960s ‘theory boom’. A pilot study, ‘The History of Theory’, appeared in Critical Inquiry in 2006.

Email:    i.hunter@uq.edu.au

Books

  • The Secularisation of the Confessional State: The Political Thought of Christian Thomasius (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007).
  • Rival Enlightenments: Civil and Metaphysical Philosophy in Early Modern Germany (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001).
  • Rethinking the School: Subjectivity, Bureaucracy, Criticism (Sydney: Allen & Unwin; New York: St Martin's, 1994).
  • On Pornography: Literature, Sexuality, and Obscenity Law (London: Macmillan; New York: St Martin's, 1993), co-authored with David Saunders and Dugald Williamson).
  • Accounting for the Humanities: The Language of Culture and the Logic of Government (Brisbane: Institute for Cultural Policy Studies, 1991), co-authored with Denise Meredyth, Bruce Smith and Geoff Stokes.
  • Culture and Government: the Emergence of Literary Education (London: Macmillan, 1988).

Edited volumes

  • Law and Politics in British Colonial Thought: Transpositions of Empire (New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2010), co-edited with Shaunnagh Dorsett.
  • Christian Thomasius: Essays on Church, State, and Politics, edited, translated and with an introduction and notes by Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007).
  • The Philosopher in Early Modern Europe: The Nature of a Contested Identity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), co-edited with Conal Condren and Stephen Gaukroger.
  • Heresy in Transition: Transforming Ideas of Heresy in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (London: Ashgate, 2005), co-edited with John Christian Laursen and Cary J. Nederman.
  • Samuel Pufendorf: The Whole Duty of Man, According to the Law of Nature, together with two discourses and a commentary by Jean Barbeyrac, edited, with an Introduction, notes and translations, by Ian Hunter and David Saunders (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003).
  • Natural Law and Civil Sovereignty: Moral Right and State Authority in Early Modern Political Thought (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Press, 2002), co-edited with David Saunders.

Recent articles and book chapters

  • "Secularization: The Birth of a Modern Combat Concept," Modern Intellectual History (forthcoming).
  • "Hayden White’s Philosophical History," New Literary History (forthcoming 2014).
  • "The Uses of Natural Law in Early Modern Germany: Christian Thomasius’s Reshaping of the Legal Persona," in Christian Callisen (ed), Reading and Writing History from Bruni to Windschuttle (London: Ashgate, forthcoming).
  • "The Law of Nature and Nations," in Aaron Garrett (ed), The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Philosophy (New York: Routledge, 2014), 559-92.
  • "Religious Freedom in Early Modern Germany: Theology, Philosophy, and Legal Casuistry," South Atlantic Quarterly 113:1 (Winter 2014): 37-62.
  • "The Mythos, Ethos, and Pathos of the Humanities," History of European Ideas, 40:1 (2014): 11-36.
  • "English Blasphemy," Humanity, 4:3 (2013): 403-428.
  • "Kant and Vattel in Context: Cosmopolitan Philosophy and Diplomatic Casuistry," History of European Ideas, 39:4 (2013): 477-502.
  • "The Figure of Man and the Territorialisation of Justice in ‘Enlightenment’ Natural Law: Pufendorf and Vattel," Intellectual History Review, 23 (3), 2013.
  • "The Tolerationist Programs of Thomasius and Locke," in Jon Parkin and Timothy Stanton (eds), Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), pp. 107-37.
  • "‘A Jus Gentium for America’: The Rules of War and the Rule of Law in the Revolutionary United States," Journal of the History of International Law 14, 2012, pp. 173-206.
  • "Vattel in Revolutionary America: From the Rules of War to the Rule of Law," in Lisa Ford and Tim Rowse (eds), Between Indigenous and Settler Governance (London: Routledge, in 2012), pp. 12-22.
  • "Theory Time: On the History of Poststructuralism," in Ian Donaldson and Mark Finnane (eds), Taking Stock: The Humanities in Australian Life Since 1968 (Perth: University of Western Australia Publishing, 2012), pp. 75-111.
  • "Kant’s Political Thought in the Prussian Enlightenment," in Elizabeth Ellis (ed), Kant’s Political Theory: Interpretations and Applications (Pittsburg: Penn State Press, 2012), pp. 170-207.
  • "Law, War, and Casuistry in Vattel’s Jus Gentium," Parergon 28 (2), 2011, pp. 87-104.
  • "Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age and Secularisation in Early Modern Germany," Modern Intellectual History 8 (3), 2011, pp. 621-46.
  • "Terror, Reason, and History," Alternatives: Global, Local, Political 36, 2011, pp. 56-63.
  • "Natural Law as Political Philosophy," in Desmond Clarke and Catherine Wilson (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), pp. 475-99.
  • "Libertad religiosa y coacción racional. Thomasius y Locke sobre la tolerancia," in Maria José Villaverde and John Christian Laursen (eds), Forjadores de la tolerancia (Madrid: Editorial Tecnos, 2011), pp. 116-40.
  • "Vattel’s Law of Nations: Diplomatic Casuistry for the Protestant Nation," Grotiana 31, 2010, pp. 108-40.
  • "Scenes from the History of Poststructuralism: Davos, Freiburg, Baltimore, Leipzig," New Literary History, 41, 2010, pp. 491-516/
  • "Kant’s Regional Cosmopolitanism," Journal of the History of International Law 12, 2010, pp. 165-88.
  • "Global Justice and Regional Metaphysics: On the Critical History of the Law of Nature and Nations," in Shaunnagh Dorsett and Ian Hunter (eds), Law and Politics in British Colonial Thought: Transpositions of Empire, (New York: Palgrave/Macmillan, 2010), pp. 11-29.
  • "Die Geschichte der Philosophie und die Persona des Philosophen," in M. Mulsow and A. Mahler (eds.), Die Cambridge School der politischen Ideengeschichte (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2010), pp. 241-83. (Revised German translation of "The History of Philosophy and the Persona of the Philosopher," Modern Intellectual History 4, 2007, pp. 571-600.)
  • "After Representation: Recent Discussions of the Relation between Language and Literature," in David Oswell (ed), Cultural Theory, London: Sage, 2010. (Republication of the 1984 article).
  • "The Man and the Citizen: The Pluralisation of Civil Personae in Early Modern German Natural Law," in Anna Yeatman and Magdalena Zolkos (eds), Security, State and Subject Formation (New York: Continuum Books, 2010), pp. 16-35.
  • "Postmodern Histories," Intellectual History Review 19, 2009, pp. 265-79.
  • "Spirituality and Philosophy in Post-Structuralist Theory," History of European Ideas 35, 2009, pp. 265-75.
  • "The Shallow Legitimacy of Secular Liberal Orders: The Case of Early Modern Brandenburg-Prussia," in Geoffrey Levey and Tariq Modood (eds), Secularism, Religion and Multicultural Citizenship (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), pp. 27-55.
  • "Talking About My Generation," Critical Inquiry 34, 2008, pp. 583-600.
  • "The Desire for Deconstruction: Derrida’s Metaphysics of Law, Communication," Culture & Politics 41, 2008, pp. 6-29.
  • "The Persona of the Philosopher in the Eighteenth Century," Intellectual History Review 18, 2008, pp. 315-17, co-authored with Conal Condren.
  • "The Time of Theory: The Return of Metaphysics to the Anglo-American Humanities Academy," Postcolonial Studies 10, 2007, pp. 5-22.
  • "Natural Law, Historiography, and Aboriginal Sovereignty," Legal History 11/2, 2007, pp. 137-68.
  • "The History of Philosophy and the Persona of the Philosopher," Modern Intellectual History 4, 2007, pp. 571-600.
  • "The History of Theory," Critical Inquiry 32, no. 4, 2006, pp. 78-112.
  • "Sacrilege and the Deconfessionalisation of Politics," in Elizabeth Coleman and Kevin White (eds), Negotiating the Sacred: Blasphemy and Sacrilege in a Multicultural Society (Canberra: ANU e Press, 2006), pp. 109-17.
  • "The University Philosopher in Early Modern Germany," in Conal Condren, Stephen Gaukroger and Ian Hunter (eds), The Philosopher in Early Modern Europe: The Nature of a Contested Identity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), pp. 35-65.
  • "Kant’s Religion and Prussian Religious Policy," Modern Intellectual History 2, 2005, pp. 1-27.
  • "The State of History and the Empire of Metaphysics," History and Theory 44, 2005, pp. 289-303.
  • "The Passions of the Prince: Moral Philosophy and Staatskirchenrecht in Thomasius’s Conception of Sovereignty," Cultural and Social History 2, 2005, pp. 113-29.
  • "Thomasius on the Toleration of Heresy," in Ian Hunter, John Christian Laursen, and Cary J. Nederman (eds), Heresy in Transition: Transforming Ideas of Heresy in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (London: Ashgate, 2005), pp. 155-67.
  • "Reading Thomasius on Heresy," Eighteenth-Century Thought 2, 2004, pp. 39-56.
  • "Conflicting Obligations: Pufendorf, Leibniz and Barbeyrac on Civil Authority," History of Political Thought 25, 2004, pp. 670-9918.
  • "Multiple Enlightenments: Rival Aufklärer at the University of Halle 1690-1730," in Martin Fitzpatrick et al., (eds), The Enlightenment World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 576-95.
  • "Christian Thomasius: The Right of Protestant Princes regarding Heretics," Eighteenth-Century Thought 2, 2004, pp. 57-98. (Translation and critical edition of Thomasius’s text).
  • "Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke’s Translation of Samuel Pufendorf’s De officio hominis et civis," History of Political Thought 24, 2003, pp. 218-34, co-authored with David Saunders.
  • "The Love of a Sage or the Command of a Superior: The Natural Law Doctrines of Leibniz and Pufendorf," in T. J. Hochstrasser and Peter Schröder (eds), Early Modern Natural Law Theories: Contexts and Strategies (Berlin: Kluwer, 2003), pp. 169-93.
  • "The Morals of Metaphysics: Kant’s Groundwork as Intellectual Paideia," Critical Inquiry 28, 2002, pp. 908-29. 

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